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All the latest Shadow Writer news and announcements.

 

2016 news can be viewed here

2015 news can be viewed here

2014 news can be viewed here

2013 news can be viewed here

2012 news can be viewed here

2011 news can be viewed here

2010 news can be viewed here

2009 news can be viewed here

2008 news can be viewed here

2007 news can be viewed here

2006 news can be viewed here

2005 news can be viewed here

2004 news can be viewed here

2003 news can be viewed here

 

February

Life-o-Matic poster

 

The big news this month is about a brand new movie that’s been made based on Paul’s story ‘Life-O-Matic’ (above) which originally appeared in Estronomicon magazine back in 2009.

The film was adapted and directed by Jim Phillips, and stars Joe Paulson (Superstition, The Talk), Christina Natividad (Saturday Night Live), Chris Pearson and Portia Gregory. A couple of the variant posters are below.

 

Life-o-Matic Poster 2

 

Life-o-Matic Poster 3

 

The film has its own Facebook page which you can find here, and will be getting its own website soon. Keep checking back for more news.

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Shadow Casting by Paul Kane, introduction by Muriel Gray

 

A glowing 9/10 review for Paul’s ‘Best of…’ collection Shadow Casting has appeared on the Hungarian website Cinegore here. But for those of you who don’t speak Hungarian, here is the translation courtesy of reviewer Zoo_Lee: ‘A few months ago I introduced you to The Rot, a post-apocalyptic novella from writer Paul Kane, which mixed the classic subgenre with some unique elements and twists. In the past we’ve received the majority of our foreign literature from Horrific Tales Publishing, however, after The Rot review, Mr. Kane sent us a press release of his latest book, titled ShadowCasting, which amongst many of his most successful stories also contains the story “Dead Time”, adapted for the Fear Itself series (as New Year’s Day). If I have to name a book with a similar structure to Shadow Casting, my closest guess from recent memory would be Clive Barker’s Books of Blood, mostly because of the different subgenres represented by the tales, spanning from horror to fantasy through dark humour…

It contains 12 stories altogether, and picking any of them as better or worse than the others would be a near impossible challenge. Still, just to list some of my favourites: “Shadow Writer” is immediately a good start, where the protagonist gets invited to interview his favourite horror author. However, his journey to the secluded master proves more and more menacing, and the meeting is about something much more than a simple interview. Another story, “Biorhythms”, is a prime example of body horror with its main character trying to get complete control over every single process and movement in his body, to handle them like everyday activities, and although he succeeds, controlling his body becomes much more challenging than he ever dared to imagine. Lastly “Men of Cloth” is a nice tribute to classic gothic cinema, featuring a family returning to the father’s old birthplace, an isolated, small village in England, of which his mother refused to speak; following his father’s death, they left for America during his early childhood. This wasn’t a coincidence as the family has a lot to learn about the strange, twisted local folklore, and the things it made the villagers do…

Of course, all the other stories are similarly unique, unusual, either paying tribute to a well-known subgenre, or twisting it beyond surreal (the only reason I didn’t place “A Chaos Demon is for Life” among the others above is because spoiling a single word of it would be a crime). Despite the different styles and structures, Kane’s writing remains on a consistent level through the stories, creating chilling, unnatural beings, sympathetic protagonists and surreal, comical situations with the same success… In summary, Shadow Casting only enforced my opinion based on The Rot, that Kane is one of the most promising modern authors, and I can only hope that sooner or later we can see some of his works on Hungarian shelves. For fans of the Fear Itself series, the book is more than worth it if only for the “Dead Time” story, but even for those who are not part of that fanbase, Shadow Casting is a very unique, high quality compilation, worthy of any horror reader’s attention.’

 

Remarques on CDs for limited edition Shadow Casting

 

And there was an important announcement from SST recently, about the fact that due to circumstances beyond their control the DVD of Confidence will not now be included in the limited edition of Shadow Casting. Instead, there will be an hour-long audio CD featuring two stories narrated by actor Phil Lunt, and with a unique signed remarque from Paul on the front of the disc (like the ones pictured above), to make it even more collectable. You can read more in the official press announcement here.

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Behind Her Eyes, Sarah Pinborough

 

Paul was out and about last month, at the friends and family only launch of Sarah Pinborough’s new thriller from HarperCollins Behind Her Eyes (pictures above and below).

 

Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough, book launch

 

The book, as modelled by Sarah below, went on to become a No. 1 Sunday Times bestseller – and you can get your copy by clicking here.

 

Sarah Pinborough, author of Behind Her Eyes

 

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Hekla's Children, by James Brogden

 

Our Guest Writer this February is James Brogden, with an exclusive extract from his new mass market novel Hekla’s Children (above). Paul was so impressed with the book when he was sent an advance copy from Titan that he said, ‘This novel marks Brodgen out as a new rising star’, a quote which appears on the back of the publication. To see what all the fuss is about, click here.

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Lunar, by Paul Kane

 

Pictures of the mass market reissue of Paul’s Lunar out on the wild have been surfacing, including the above courtesy of Esther Mullings who commented: ‘This book by Paul Kane had me on a tense ride throughout, great main character and you feel his desperation. Yet again Paul has delivered a wonderful energy-driven horror that I will revisit. 10/10 for this fan!’

 

Lunar, by Paul Kane

 

While you’re waiting for the movie version, you can get your hands on a copy by clicking here or here.

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The Rot, by Paul Kane

 

Another glowing recommendation now, this time by DLS Reviews for Paul’s novella The Rot (above). Here’s what they had to say: ‘Introducing Paul Kane’s novella we have fellow author, Tim Lebbon, who offers up an appetite-whetting four-page introduction in which he talks of his and our draw to apocalyptic fiction, how Kane’s offering takes us down a whole new path, and the careful balancing act at play within the novella. It’s a fabulously praise-filled foreword that sets the mood perfectly for the bleakness to come.

I use the word “bleak” but trust me, there’s a hell of a lot more to Kane’s novella than just a bleak apocalyptic vision where humanity is gradually reduced to nothing.  Yeah, it’s fucking depressing at times. Emotions are conveyed in the rawest, most delicate and damaged of states. Yet at times there’s also the beginnings of hope – clawing at the grit and grime – attempting to break through. There’s so much honest-to-god humanity within the pages – you feel crushed and cut down, only to be resuscitated and nursed to some iota of health…at which point the incessant cycle starts up again. The story itself is written via our protagonist – Adam Keller’s recorded version of events, recalled over the three months following the outbreak to where he is now. Undoubtedly one of the novella’s key strengths is the prose of this first person narrative. It helps deliver that much-needed human element. There’s an honesty to the dialogue. A believable voice. It pulls you in – putting you behind Keller’s eyes and inside the character’s head.

Essentially the story kicks off with a textbook post-apocalyptic setting. Our principal protagonist is flung into the thick of the end of the world, with violent chaos erupting everywhere and absolutely no idea what’s going on. The horror of it all comes hurtling in within these first few pages, with Kane unleashing scene after scene of barbaric violence to underline one of the principal symptoms of the disease. Indeed, aside from the “Rotting” element (which I’ll come to in a minute) the rest of the novella reads like a reasonably toned-down Crossed instalment merged with Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend (1954) along with a touch of Earth Abides (1949) and The Purple Cloud (1901). Yes there’s plenty of violence and adrenaline-pumping edge-of-the-seat action thrown in. But there are also layers of emotional turmoil, loss and longing in there. Our protagonist’s journey isn’t so much a character arc as it is a systematic deconstruction and then reconstruction of one man’s crumbling psyche.

Behind all of this, like an overshadowing and ever-present cloud of oppression, is the Rot. Its presence is a gradual decay. There are hints of things deteriorating, scattered through the early pages. And then suddenly the gravity of the Rot’s impact upon the world hits like a breezeblock to the face. Buildings are crumbling. Streets are caving in. Vehicles are breaking down. It’s like a malignant cancer, spreading throughout the world and destroying absolutely everything in its wake. Even if you feel that you’ve already read more than your fair share of post-apocalyptic fiction, I urge you not to dismiss Kane’s offering to this otherwise overly saturated subgenre. The backdrop may be reasonably well-trodden ground, but it’s with the depth of characterisation, the voice given to our protagonist, the purpose given to each and every one of the secondary characters that Kane introduces, and the magnitude of the emotional warfare at play, that the novella stands taller than the majority of tales it rubs shoulders with. A veritable masterclass in emotion-rich post-apocalyptic fiction.’

You can read the full review here.

And you can order the book in hardback on Amazon here, here, and on Barnes and Noble here, or the Kindle edition here and here

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The Disease, by Paul Kane

 

Comic news now, and Paul’s first ever one – The Disease – published by Hellbound Media, has been nominated for a Ghastly Award in the one-shot category, alongside the likes of Joe Hill’s Locke & Key. You can see a full list of the nominees here and cast your vote here.

You can also buy the comic direct from the publisher here.

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Between the Tracks, Tales from the Ghost Train

 

Short story news, and Paul’s ‘When Push Comes to Shove’ will be included in the forthcoming anthology Between the Tracks, edited by Steve Dillon and including such luminaries as Clive Barker, Ramsey Campbell and Christopher Golden. More details as and when.

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Starburst Bookworm Podcast

 

You can now listen to the Starburst Bookworm podcast which was recorded live at Sledge-Lit last December and features Paul, Stephen Volk and Gavin Thorpe. Just click here to be thoroughly entertained.

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Last but not least, regular visitors to the site will know that February is Paul’s birthday month, so we’re sure you’ll join us in wishing him a very happy one this year!

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January

Nightshift by Stephen King, art by Dave McKean

 

A very Happy New Year, and what better way to move into 2017 than with news that Paul and Marie have been asked to to write an afterword for the gorgeous hardback edition of Stephen King’s famous collection Night Shift (above), due to be published by PS soon. 

 

Graveyard Shift, Stephen King

 

Night Shift, as well as being a milestone in the genre, was of course King’s first collection. It gathered together many short stories that would go on to be adapted for film and television, including Graveyard Shift (above), The Lawnmower Man, Sometimes They Come Back (below), The Mangler, Children of the Corn (also below)…

 

Sometimes They Come Back, Stephen King

 

Children of the Corn, Stephen King

 

…and one of Paul’s particular favourites – the Emmy-winning adaptation of Battleground by Richard Christian Matheson for the Nightmares and Dreamscapes TV series (starring William Hurt, below).

 

William Hurt, starring in Battleground, adapted from the story of the same name by Stephen King

 

This new edition of the book features superb cover art and internal illustrations (below) by none other than Dave McKean – who visitors to the site might remember provided the covers for Paul’s two RED books (the third of which is coming later this year, Deep RED).

 

Night Shift, Interior artwork by Dave McKean

 

Night Shift, interior artwork - Jerusalem's Lot - Dave McKean

 

Night Shift, interior artwork, Dave McKean

 

To pre-order your copy, visit the PS Publishing website by clicking here.

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Sherlock Holmes and the Servants of Hell, Paul Kane

 

There have been more mentions for Sherlock Holmes and the Servants of Hell in various ‘Best of 2016’ listings, including at The Tattooed Book Geek (above) here, The Grim Reader here, Dark Musings here, Pop Shifter here, a double mention in novels and horror on ebookwyrm here, and an international mention at Horreur Quebec here.

 

Books of the Year

 

In addition, the book was presented with an SFSF Social ‘Skadi Award’ for Best Novel in their year’s round-up.

 

 As always, you can keep up to date with all reviews, interviews and announcements on the Servants Facebook page here and you can order the book itself online here, here and at the publisher's site here.

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Defender, by G X Todd

 

The first Guest Writer of this year is GX Todd, whose stunning debut novel Defender (above and below) has been called ‘worthy to take its place alongside The Stand in the canon. An absolute gem of a book’ by John Connolly and ‘compelling, suspenseful, and altogether extraordinary’ by Lee Child. You can read an exclusive extract and see what all the fuss is about for yourself simply by clicking here.

 

Defender, G X Todd

 

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Disease, by Paul Kane and Pawel Kardis

 

Finally, a review of Paul’s comic The Disease (above and below) has appeared at Kult Creations. Here’s what they had to say: ‘This is a glossy, serious and professional product that wouldn’t look out of place coming out of some big American comics company… It belongs to the long horror tradition of “body horror”, where someone’s very body is invaded and subsumed (Cronenberg’s The Fly for example) – in short, where your body becomes… monstrous. It’s no secret that “body horror” is so disturbing because it’s a metaphor for disease. Here the metaphor is stripped away and Kane just goes for the visceral horror of the tale of a man overtaken by a terrible illness that warps his body. This probably wouldn’t be as effective (and infecting) as it is without Kardis’s shocking, photo-realistic painted art. No word of a lie – this is as good as anything produced by Alex Ross. He is as confident depicting the beauty of the semi-naked female form as he is the contents of a toilet bowel! His work is both hideous and gorgeous at the same time. Not for children or the faint hearted. If you care about comics as a medium for storytelling, do yourself a favour and pick this up.’

 

The Disease, by Paul Kane and Pawel Kardis

 

You can read the full thing here and buy the comic from Hellbound Media here.

 

 

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2016 news can be viewed here

2015 news can be viewed here

2014 news can be viewed here

2013 news can be viewed here

2012 news can be viewed here

2011 news can be viewed here

2010 news can be viewed here

2009 news can be viewed here

2008 news can be viewed here

2007 news can be viewed here

2006 news can be viewed here

2005 news can be viewed here

2004 news can be viewed here

2003 news can be viewed here

 

© Paul Kane 2003-2017. All rights reserved. Materials (including images) may not be reproduced without express permission from the author.